Part 105—Parachute jumps

Subpart A—General

Sec 105.1 Applicability

A. This part prescribes rules governing parachute jumps made in the United States except parachute jumps necessary because of an inflight emergency.

B. For the purposes of this part, a "parachute jump" means the descent of a person, to the surface from an aircraft in flight, when he intends to use, or uses, a parachute during all or part of that descent.

 

Subpart B—Operating Rules

Sec 105.11 Applicability

A. Except as provided in paragraphs B and C of this section, this subpart prescribes operating rules governing parachute jumps to which this part applies.

B. This subpart does not apply to a parachute jump necessary to meet an emergency on the surface, when it is made at the direction, or with the approval, of an agency of the United States, or of a State, Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia, or a possession of the United States, or of a political subdivision of any of them.

C. Sections 105.13 through 105.17 and sections 105.27 through 105.37 of this subpart B do not apply to a parachute jump made by a member of an Armed Force:

1. Over or within a restricted area when that area is under the control of an Armed Force; or

2. In military operations in uncontrolled airspace.

D. Section 105.23 does not apply to a parachute jump made by a member of an Armed Force within a restricted area that extends upward from the surface when that area is under the control of an Armed Force.

[Doc. No. 1491, 27 FR 11636, Nov. 27, 1962, as amended by Amdt. 105-4, 33 FR 11901, Aug. 22, 1968]

Sec 105.13 General

No person may make a parachute jump, and no pilot in command of an aircraft may allow a parachute jump to be made from that aircraft, if that jump creates a hazard to air traffic or to persons or property on the surface.

Sec 105.14 Radio equipment and use requirements

A. Except when otherwise authorized by ATC:

1. No person may make a parachute jump, and no pilot in command of an aircraft may allow a parachute jump to be made from that aircraft, in or into controlled airspace unless, during that flight—

a. The aircraft is equipped with a functioning two-way radio communications system appropriate to the ATC facilities to be used;

b. Radio communications have been established between the aircraft and the nearest FAA air traffic control facility or FAA flight service station at least 5 minutes before the jumping activity is to begin, for the purpose of receiving information in the aircraft about known air traffic in the vicinity of the jumping activity; and

c. The information described in paragraph A.1.b of this section has been received by the pilot in command and the jumpers in that flight; and

2. The pilot in command of an aircraft used for any jumping activity in or into controlled airspace shall, during each flight:

a. Maintain or have maintained a continuous watch on the appropriate frequency of the aircraft’s radio communications system from the time radio communications are first established between the aircraft and ATC, until he advises ATC that the jumping activity is ended from that flight; and

b. Advise ATC that the jumping activity is ended for that flight when the last parachute jumper from the aircraft reaches the ground.

B. If, during any flight, the required radio communications system is or becomes inoperative, any jumping activity from the aircraft in or into controlled airspace shall be abandoned. However, if the communications system becomes inoperative in flight after receipt of a required ATC authorization, the jumping activity from that flight may be continued.

[Amdt. 105-2, 31 FR 16612, Dec. 29, 1966]

Sec 105.15 Jumps over or into congested areas or open air assembly of persons

A. No person may make a parachute jump, and no pilot in command of an aircraft may allow a parachute jump to be made from that aircraft, over or into a congested area of a city, town, or settlement, or an open air assembly of person unless a certificate of authorization for that jump has been issued under this section. However, a parachutist may drift over that congested area or open air assembly with a fully deployed and properly functioning parachute if he is at a sufficient altitude to avoid creating a hazard to persons and property on the ground.

B. An application for a certificate of authorization issued under this section is made in a form and in a manner prescribed by the Administrator and must be submitted to the FAA Flight Standards District Office having jurisdiction over the area in which the parachute jump is to be made, at least 4 days before the day of that jump.

C. Each holder of a certificate of authorization issued under this section shall present that certificate for inspection upon the request of the Administrator, or any Federal, State, or local official.

[Doc. No. 1491, 27 FR 11636, Nov. 27, 1962, as amended by Doc. No. 4057, Amdt. 105-1, 29 FR 14920, Nov. 4, 1964; Amdt. 105-7, 43 FR 22641, May 25, 1978]

Sec 105.17 Jumps over or onto airports

Unless prior approval has been given by the airport management, no person may make a parachute jump, and no pilot in command of an aircraft may allow a parachute jump to be made from that aircraft:

A. Over an airport that does not have a functioning control tower operated by the United States; or

B. Onto any airport. However, a parachutist may drift over that airport with a fully deployed and properly functioning parachute if he is at least 2,000 feet above that airport’s traffic pattern, and avoids creating a hazard to air traffic or to persons and property on the ground.

[Doc. No. 4057, Amdt. 105-1, 29 FR 14920, Nov. 4, 1964]

Sec 105.19 Jumps in or into Class A, Class B, Class C, and Class D airspace

A. No person may make a parachute jump, and no pilot in command may allow a parachute jump to be made from that aircraft, in or into Class A, Class B, Class C, and Class D airspace without, or in violation of, the terms of an ATC authorization issued under this section.

B. Each request for an authorization under this section must be submitted to the nearest FAA air traffic control facility or FAA flight service station and must include the information prescribed by Sec. 105.25A.

[Effective Date Note: Amdt. 105-10, 56 FR 65663, Dec. 17, 1991, revised Sec. 105.19 effective September 16, 1993.]

Sec 105.23 Jumps in or into other airspace

A. No person may make a parachute jump, and no pilot in command of an aircraft may allow a parachute jump to be made from that aircraft, in or into airspace unless the nearest FAA air traffic control facility or FAA flight service station was notified of that jump at least 1 hour before the jump is to be made, but not more than 24 hours before the jumping is to be completed, and the notice contained the information prescribed in section 105.25A.

B. Notwithstanding paragraph A of this section, ATC may accept from a parachute jumping organization a written notification of a scheduled series of jumps to be made over a stated period of time not longer than 12 calendar months. The notification must contain the information prescribed by section 105.25A, identify the responsible persons associated with that jumping activity, and be submitted at least 15 days, but not more than 30 days, before the jumping is to begin. ATC may revoke the acceptance of the notification for any failure of the jumping organization to comply with its terms.

C. This section does not apply to parachute jumps in or into any airspace or place described in section 105.15, section 105.19, or section 105.21.

[Amdt. 105-2, 31 FR 16612, Dec. 29, 1966]

Sec 105.25 Information required, and notice of cancellation or postponement of jump

A. Each person requesting an authorization under section 105.19 or section 105.21, and each person submitting a notice under section 105.23, must include the following information (on an individual or group basis) in that request or notice:

1. The date and time jumping will begin.

2. The size of the jump zone expressed in nautical mile radius around the target.

3. The location of the center of the jump zone in relation to—

a. The nearest (VOR) facility in terms of the VOR radial on which it is located, and its distance in nautical miles from the VOR facility when that facility is 30 nautical miles or less from the drop zone target; or

b. The nearest airport, town, or city depicted on the appropriate Coast and Geodetic Survey WAC or Sectional Aeronautical chart, when the nearest VOR facility is more than 30 nautical miles from the drop zone target.

4. The altitudes above mean sea level at which jumping will take place.

5. The duration of the intended jump.

6. The name, address, and telephone number of the person requesting the authorization or giving notice.

7. The identification of the aircraft to be used.

8. The radio frequencies, if any, available in the aircraft.

B. Each person requesting an authorization under section 105.19 or section 105.21, and each person submitting a notice under section 105.23, must promptly notify the FAA air traffic control facility or FAA flight service station from which it requested authorization or which it notified, if the proposed or scheduled jumping activity is canceled or postponed.

[Amdt. 105-2, 31 FR 16612, Dec. 29, 1966, as amended by Amdt. 105-6, 41 FR 47229, Oct. 28, 1976; Amdt. 105-9, 51 FR 21907, June 17, 1986]

Sec 105.27 Jumps over or within restricted or prohibited areas

No person may make a parachute jump, and no pilot in command may allow a parachute jump to be made from that aircraft, over or within a restricted area or prohibited area unless the controlling agency of the area concerned has authorized that jump.

Sec. 105.29 Flight visibility and clearance from clouds requirements

No person may make a parachute jump, and no pilot in command of an aircraft may allow a parachute jump to be made from that aircraft:

A. Into or through a cloud; or

B. When the flight visibility is less, or at a distance from clouds that is less, than that prescribed in the following table:

 

Altitude Flight Visibility Distance from clouds

(statute miles)

1,200 feet 3 500 feet below or less 1,000 feet above

above the 2,000 feet horizontal surface regardless

of the MSL

altitude

More than 3 500 feet below

1,200 feet 1,000 above

above the 2,000 feet horizontal

surface but

less than

10,000 feet

MSL

More than 5 1,000 feet below 1,200 feet 1,000 feet

above the 1 mile horizontal

surface and at

or above

10,000 feet

MSL

[Amdt. 105-5, 36 FR 8775, May 13, 1971]

Sec 105.33 Parachute jumps between sunset and sunrise

A. No person may make a parachute jump, and no pilot in command of an aircraft may allow any person to make a parachute jump from that aircraft, between sunset and sunrise, unless that person is equipped with a means of producing a light visible for at least 3 statute miles.

B. Each person making a parachute jump between sunset and sunrise shall display the light required by paragraph A of this section from the time that person exits the aircraft until that person reaches the surface.

[Amdt. 105-7, 43 FR 22641, May 25, 1978]

Sec 105.35 Liquor and drugs

No person may make a parachute jump while, and no pilot in command of an aircraft may allow a person to make a parachute jump from that aircraft if that person appears to be:

A. Under the influence of intoxicating liquor; or

B. Using any drug that affects his faculties in any way contrary to safety.

 

Sec 105.37 Inspections

The Administrator may inspect (including inspections at the jump site), any parachute jump operation to which this part applies, to determine compliance with the regulations of this part.

Subpart C—Parachute Equipment

Sec 105.41 Applicability

A. Except as provided in paragraph B of this section, this subpart prescribes rules governing parachute equipment used in parachute jumps to which this part applies.

B. This subpart does not apply to a parachute jump made by a member of an Armed Force using parachute equipment of an Armed Force.

 

Sec 105.43 Parachute equipment and packing requirements

A. No person may make a parachute jump, and no pilot in command of an aircraft may allow any person to make a parachute jump from that aircraft, unless that person is wearing a single harness dual parachute pack, having at least one main parachute and one approved auxiliary parachute that are packed as follows:

1. The main parachute must have been packed by a certificated parachute rigger, or by the person making the jump, within 120 days before the date of its use.

2. The auxiliary must have been packed by a certified and appropriately rated parachute rigger:

a. Within 120 days before the date of use, if its canopy, shroud, and harness are composed exclusively of nylon, rayon, or other similar synthetic fiber or material that is substantially resistant to damage from mold, mildew, or other fungi and other rotting agents propagated in a moist environment; or

b. Within 60 days before the date of use, if it is composed in any amount of silk, pongee, or other natural fiber, or material not specified in paragraph A.2.a of this section.

B. No person may make a parachute jump using a static line attached to the aircraft and the main parachute unless an assist device, described and attached as follows, is used to aid the pilot chute in performing its function, or, if no pilot chute is used, to aid in the direct deployment of the main parachute canopy.

1. The assist device must be long enough to allow the container to open before a load is placed on the device.

2. The assist device must have a static load strength of:

a. At least 28 pounds but not more than 160 pounds, if it is used to aid the pilot chute in performing its function; or

b. At least 56 pounds but not more than 320 pounds, if it is used to aid in the direct deployment of the main parachute canopy.

3. The assist device must be attached:

a. At one end, to the static line above the static line pins, or, if static pins are not used, above the static line ties to the parachute cone; and

b. At the other end, to the pilot chute apex, bridle cord or bridle loop, or, if no pilot chute is used, to the main parachute canopy.

 

C. No person may attach an assist device required by paragraph B of this section to any main parachute unless he has a current parachute rigger certificate issued under Part 65 of this chapter or is the person who makes the jump with that parachute.

D. For the purpose of this section, an "approved" parachute is:

1. A parachute manufactured under a type certificate or a technical standard order (C-23 series); or

2. A personnel-carrying military parachute (other than a high altitude, high-speed, or ejection kind) identified by an NAF, AAF, or AN drawing number, an AAF order number, or any other military designation or specification number.

[Doc. No. 1491, 27 FR 11636, Nov. 27, 1962 as amended by Amdt. 105-3, 33 FR 8481 June 8, 1968; Amdt. 105-7, 43 FR 22641, May 25, 1978]

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